RADIO STATION RECEPTIONIST’S JOB DESCRIPTION

by Dan O'Day on April 24, 2012

radio station jobs

This is another in my series of brief yet relevant radio job descriptions.

Yes, I know your radio station might not even employ a receptionist. Thanks to the glories of consolidation, automation and “economies of scale,” callers to far too many of those “personal, local radio stations” are greeting by The Phone Tree From Hell.

Some radio stations, however, still do have human beings answering the telephone. This job description is for them:

To help our friends & customers when they call us.

If your station has a receptionist, is that how they define the job?

Or do they see their job as “transferring the call to the right department” — or, at least, transferring it to someone (thereby getting rid of the caller)?

Everyone who telephones your radio station is either a friend (listener, supporter, fan, etc.) or a customer (advertiser, sponsor, supplier). Is that how your receptionist treats them?

Comments

comments

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

James April 24, 2012 at 10:02 am

I think there’s something to be said for a friendly face greeting you as you walk in the door. If budget is an issue, there are many interns out there who’d be more than happy to do it!

Rich Roszel April 24, 2012 at 8:27 pm

I would say the same description should be a part of every DJ’s job description — assuming your station still has live people working ANYWHERE in the building. I remember a jock at a station I used to work for who never answered the phone on his evening shift unless there was a contest going on or it was the hotline. Talk about a missed opportunity!

(1) He would likely make the night of the person calling who actually got through to someone.
(2) He would have a better idea of what’s on the mind of the people listening.
(3) He might convert a caller into a faithful listener and word-of-mouth promoter. (The list goes on.)

And I agree with James that a friendly face or voice goes a long way in terms of station relations.

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